Identifying Intelligent Plans Of Breaking News

Uncovered Ideas On Elementary Tactics

Ole Miss newspaper says Nick Saban is overrated before kickoff

Following the arrival of his first No. 1 overall recruiting class, Saban won his first of five national championships at Alabama. The machine was running. Now, he didn’t even need to recruit. Everybody wanted to play for the national champions. “Saban’s early recruiting created a system in which the best players in the nation showed up on the Alabama campus, won games and titles, got drafted into the NFL and left a spot for the next round of the nation’s top recruits to take over. With this in mind, five national titles really does not seem like enough in an 11-year period. Every season in recent memory, the Tide has had a national championship-or-bust mentality. If Saban were as good at being a head coach as he is at recruiting, Alabama would have won the national title on a yearly basis. But he isn’t.” Scouring the newspaper’s web site, there’s another headline in the game’s lead-up that is quite eye-catching in the aftermath — “Rebel Football gears up to compete physically, mentally with Bama”.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit https://247sports.com/Article/Alabama-Crimson-Tide-Ole-Miss-newspaper-says-Nick-Saban-is-overrated-before-kickoff-122012179/

A Closer Look At No-hassle Tactics

Aspiring sportswriter spends summer covering basketball for Arizona the Republic newspaper

Clevis Murray has been working on his game, hoping to improve his chances of making the NBA – as a journalist, not a player. The Dorchester native and Suffolk University senior got a bit closer to his goal this summer, gaining valuable experience covering pro hoops on a daily basis as a sports writer for the Arizona Republic. “This opportunity helped me to gain hands-on experience at a high level,” said Murray. He reported on the Phoenix Mercury of the WNBA, the Phoenix Suns’ pre-draft workouts, and the NBA Summer League in Las Vegas for Arizona’s largest daily newspaper. “I love basketball, and being around the sport, the players, and the media in those environments as a reporter was great,” he said. “Summer League is a marquee NBA event and something I always wanted to cover and was lucky enough to do so.” The reporting experience was made possible through a Pulliam Fellowship from the Gannett Company, Inc. From the time he entered Suffolk, Murray has been single-minded in his career goals. “Having known Clevis as a student since his freshman year, his personal growth has been a pleasure to observe,” said Professor Monika Raesch, chair of the Communication & Journalism Department. “His passion for sports coupled with his studies has opened so many doors for him that I hope he is very proud of.” Raesch enjoys her role as Murray’s faculty adviser.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit https://www.dotnews.com/2018/aspiring-sportswriter-spends-summer-covering-basketball-arizona

by Tom Kludt and Jill Disis   @CNNMoney August 29, 2018: 1:28 PM ET Pages for the Dallas Morning News are fed through a printing press in Plano, Texas, on Thursday, December 17, 2009. The US International Trade Commission voted Wednesday to terminate tariffs imposed on newsprint imported from Canada , a decision that was celebrated by the American newspaper industry. In what amounts to a blow to the Department of Commerce, which upheld the tariffs earlier this month, the International Trade Commission found that the imports of Canadian paper do not hurt American producers. The commission’s vote was unanimous. The tariffs proved onerous for US newspapers already battling economic headwinds, from dwindling advertising revenues to declining readership. The Tampa Bay Times said it cut about 50 jobs earlier this year , a decision that the paper’s publisher attributed to an additional $3 million in expenses imposed by the tariffs. And last week, the LaGrange Daily News in Georgia said it will start printing five editions a week instead of six due in part to the “rapid increases in newsprint costs.” Groups representing the newspaper industry like the News Media Alliance, which represents about 2,000 newspapers in North America, lobbied against the tariffs. “We applaud the International Trade Commission for today reaching a final, unanimous negative determination that Canadian imports of uncoated groundwood paper, which includes newsprint used by newspapers, do not cause material harm to the U.S. paper industry,” David Chavern, the president and CEO of the News Media Alliance, said in a statement on Wednesday. Although the Department of Commerce revised the tariffs to lower levels, Chavern said they still “would have been unsustainable for newspapers, other printers and publishers and printers.” Related: Local newspapers fear tariffs could cripple them The ITC’s vote on Wednesday will help address some of these concerns.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit https://money.cnn.com/2018/08/29/media/newsprint-tariffs-vote/index.html

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